“A Man’s A Man For A’ That” Comes to Canada, Eh?

“A Man’s A Man For A’ That” Comes to Canada, Eh?

Co-author and Editor Gayle continues to feel bad that the pandemic has prevented her from having an in-person book launch for her late husband Ian Moore-Morrans’ second memoir, Came To Canada, Eh? Adventures of a Scottish Nomad.


However, today brought some boosts to her outlook. First of all a call from Charles H. Cameron, a fellow member of the Robert Burns Club of Winnipeg, that we perhaps can soon start planning a book launch once the Burns Club can meet again for their monthly luncheon meetings, as well as giving Gayle some ideas about further promoting the book.


Then later that day she returned to her apartment and found this nice note on her shelf from a fellow resident of her senior’s high rise, (a British-born immigrant, like Ian), who had recently bought a copy of the book from Gayle.

Dear Gayle,

I did enjoy reading Ian’s book “Came To Canada, Eh?” It was a hoot! But I was again struck by his unskeptical and unsuspecting manner as I earlier evidenced [in his first memoir] “From Poverty to Poverty: A Scotsman Encounters Canada.” As I had indicated [an alternate title might have been] – “Innocents Abroad.”
However, when I read the Epilogue and noted that Ian had chosen ‘honesty’ as (what he thought) his most important characteristic, it somehow all fell into place!
Because he was such a generous, trustworthy person, he trusted others to be as open and honest as himself. What a guy!

Regards, Pat


Gayle soon replied: Thanks , dear friend, for those words. You are the first one to give me feedback on my final contribution to the book. And you got the exact purpose of that Epilogue and why I originally chose Robert Burns’ poem, “A Man’s A Man For A’ That” as the book’s epigraph. You made my day!

The first part of the above-mentioned Epilogue is quoted below:

When choosing the epigraph from Scottish poet Robert Burns (“A Man’s A Man For A’ That”) at the beginning of this book, I recalled a conversation with Ian some years ago. While creating a program about writing one’s faith journey, I thought I’d try Ian out on one of the proposed exercises by asking him to choose one word to describe the characteristic he thought most important in living his life. I had used Christian for myself and was expecting that he would choose Scottish. He surprised me though, by choosing honesty. Of course, I thought, that was Ian in a nutshell–honest! He strove throughout his life to support or protest his view that the true worth of a person (himself and others alike) is defined by honesty and independent mind rather than by class or riches or position in life. And I think this book proves it! However, it also thoroughly demonstrates that he was intrinsically Scottish and nomadic as well.

From P. 331, Came To Canada, Eh? Adventures of a Scottish Nomad, by Ian Moore-Morrans with Gayle Moore-Morrans, First Edition, 2020.

The above-mentioned Epigraph (a poem or quote to introduce the theme of a book) is quoted below, along with Ian’s added underlining of portions from this favourite Robert Burns poem as found in his well-worn copy of The Poems and Songs of Robert Burns, 1759-1796, Collins, London and Glasgow, and accompanying Glossary by James MacKenna. This underlining helped Gayle in choosing this particular poem as the book’s epigraph.


“A Man’s A Man For A’ That” An Ordinary Scotsman Shares Extraordinary Journey in Final Memoir

“A Man’s A Man For A’ That” An Ordinary Scotsman Shares Extraordinary Journey in Final Memoir

Robert Burns Day, January 25, is an appropriate time to post this recent press release. Some of Burns’ poetry as well as the Winnipeg Burns Club feature in several of the stories therein. If you haven’t got your copy yet, it’s not too late!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PRESS RELEASE

[Winnipeg, MB – January 12, 2021] In this month of celebrating the birthday of Scotland’s bard, Robert Burns, a new memoir by a Scotsman-turned-Canadian is being celebrated. Canada is known for being a mosaic of people who have immigrated here in search of a better life. The late Scotsman, Ian Moore-Morrans, was one such immigrant. This second and newest memoir, Came To Canada, Eh? Adventures of a Scottish Nomad documents his experience, after finally overcoming poverty to settle into a life of (sometimes uncertain and chaotic) middle class prosperity in Canada.

To quote a Winnipeg reviewer: Put down that celebrity bio and pick up Came to Canada, Eh? Ian is the real deal, the most relatable Everyman you will ever meet…. His indomitable spirit and quirky humour sustain him through a rollercoaster of adventures and tragedies, and the ride even leads him to a second chance at love at the end of the road. Don’t miss this!

Came To Canada, Eh? Adventures of a Scottish Nomad by Ian Moore-Morrans with Gayle Moore-Morrans offers the story of an ordinary, yet truly extraordinary Scotsman and his endeavours to survive and thrive as an immigrant to becoming an eventual citizen in a new country – Canada. Despite facing numerous roadblocks, Ian perseveres – with enthusiasm or sometimes impulsiveness in facing new possibilities in far-flung parts of Canada, in the humour that rarely leaves him despite setbacks and encounters with less-than-honest persons, in his willingness to share his evolving talents as a musician and writer, and in his honesty and obvious love for family and constantly changing circumstances.

The full extent of Ian’s nomadic ways is both fascinating and stunning. From 1970 to 2002, Ian and his first wife Mary moved almost annually, living multiple times in six provinces (including five times in Winnipeg) within 34 years. Ian’s story also documents the two years following the death of Mary, when he encountered Gayle, the soulmate of his later life, their whirlwind romance and marriage and their decision to continue Ian’s nomadic ways as they embarked on a new adventure to Mexico.

After Ian’s death at age 86 in 2019, Gayle as editor and co-author, was able to finish Ian’s story and offer it for publication with her insights into its central theme of honesty and independence of mind as exemplified in the immortal Robert Burns’ poem, “A Man’s A Man For A’ That.”

Came To Canada, Eh? Adventures of a Scottish Nomad by Ian Moore-Morrans with Gayle Moore-Morrans (a sequel to Ian’s first memoir, From Poverty to Poverty: A Scotsman Encounters Canada), produced by Moomor Publishing through FriesenPress, is available in print and as an eBook from most major online book retailers including Amazon and the FriesenPress Bookstore. (Paperback copies are available at a special reduced price in Winnipeg by contacting Gayle directly or in Flin Flon at Tiff’s Puppy Parlour.)

About the Author
Ian Moore-Morrans, a machinist by trade, as well as a Scottish entertainer–singing and playing in bands for well over fifty years in Canada, the UK, Egypt and Mexico–and a busy husband, father and grandfather, rarely found time for writing until his early sixties. After retirement (and marrying an editor), he quickly excelled, being named one of the 50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading by THE AUTHORS SHOW in 2014. Came To Canada, Eh? Adventures of a Scottish Nomad is his fifth published book.

Gayle Moore-Morrans, Moomor Publishing
gayleian@gmail.com

MY AMERICAN-CANADIAN CHRISTMAS EVE – 2020

                                                                                                                                                                                                      

‘Twas my first COVID Christmas. My suite felt like a tomb.

Neither tree lights nor angels got rid of the gloom.

My face masks lay scattered in every direction,

Lined with filters of carbon for extra protection.

The protocol list had been followed with care,

With the odor of sanitizers filling the air.

I soon found myself almost asleep,

Counting numbers of hand washes, instead of sheep.

Then just at the time I was starting to snore,

I heard at my suite door a clamorous roar.

Though still in my pjs, I peered out in dread,

At a bearded old man who was dressed all in red.

THE GHOST OF CHRISTMASES PAST–Santa Claus

“My name is Saint Nick, and the reason I’m here,

Is your grandkids should know there’s no Christmas this year.

So Facetime Gus/Eva/Ana in Norway and say,

‘The assortment of presents that I already mailed on,

Should be saved ’til next Christmas if the virus has gone.’”

Then before I could speak, he was turning around,

Taking the elevator down with nary a sound. 

I climbed back in bed, but couldn’t sleep at all,

Because of a noise that I heard down the hall.

When I checked what it was, there was no need to ask,

Joe Biden was there with his shades and a mask.

THE GHOST OF CHRISTMAS PRESENT-US President-Elect Joe Biden

“I hear Christmas is cancelled, and your family is sad,

But here is some news, that should make you glad,

For four years our country has been in a slump,

So on January 20th, we’re going to dump Trump!

Because of this man, the whole world is grouchy,

Especially the scientist, Anthony Fauci,

Anti-maskers and vaxxers will soon sing the blues,

Because Biden is coming, and that’s not fake news.”

I tossed and I turned for the rest of the night,

After Biden, with Harris, had faded from sight,

That left me aflutter, though with nothing to fear,

But I wondered and pondered who else might appear.

THE GHOST OF CHRISTMAS YET TO COME-Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

Then I heard a voice, saying, “It will only cause trouble,

If you get close to people who are not in your bubble.”

Keep six feet apart, to avoid germs systemic.

Don’t be an idiot; let’s defeat this pandemic.

A vaccine is coming, which should ease your frustration,

But until it arrives, practice self-isolation.

Heed Dr. Tam’s advice, it will help ease the pain,

Then your life as you knew it, will return once again”.

MY CHRISTMAS EVE WISH

Stay hopeful and healthy, this nightmare will end,

And your days can be spent with more than one friend.

Soon this darkness will vanish, replaced by the dawn,

And your memories of COVID will soon be all gone.

This grandmother is hoping next year will be bright,

So we can worship in church on a Christmas Eve night.

Now with a wink of my eye, and a twist of my head,

This American-Canadian is off to my bed!

Gayle Moore-Morrans

(with thanks to David Carter, for permission to adapt and paraphrase

his original poem: Christmas Spirits-2020.)

A Virtual Interview About Moomor Publishing’s Newest Book: Came To Canada, Eh? Adventures of a Scottish Nomad

A Virtual Interview About Moomor Publishing’s Newest Book: Came To Canada, Eh? Adventures of a Scottish Nomad

Can you briefly summarize your book?

This sequel to Ian Moore-Morrans’ first memoir, From Poverty to Poverty: A Scotsman Encounters Canada, continues the story of an ordinary, yet truly extraordinary Scotsman and his endeavours to survive and thrive as an immigrant to and eventual citizen in a new country, CANADA. The full extent of Ian’s “nomadic” ways is both fascinating and stunning. From 1970 to 2002, Ian and his first wife Mary had moved almost annually. They lived multiple times in six provinces and had two extensive trips to Britain within 34 years. Ian’s story also documents the two years following the death of Mary, when he encountered Gayle, the soulmate of his later life, their whirlwind romance and marriage and their decision to continue Ian’s nomadic ways as they embarked on a new adventure to Mexico. Readers will marvel at the sheer volume of roadblocks that Ian encounters in finding and keeping skilled machinist jobs in volatile economic times, in his enthusiasm and sometimes impulsiveness in facing new possibilities in far-flung parts of Canada, in the humour that rarely leaves him despite setbacks and encounters with less-than-honest persons, in his willingness to explore and share his evolving talents as a musician and writer and in his honesty and obvious love in dealing with family members and constantly changing circumstances.

Who makes up your book’s target audience?

People of any age, especially those who are interested in the Scots and their tendency to populate, entertain and bring their culture and expertise to the world. In this age of refugees and mass immigration, it could be advantageous to learn of one particular Scot’s adventures as he encountered obstacles, prejudice and triumphs in adjusting to the culture of a new country.

What are your book’s key themes?

Memoir/Autobiography
Scottishness
Music and Writing as Avocations
Immigration to Canada
Life in Canada in the 1970s-early 2000s
Master Machining – Skilled Blue Collar Work
Recessions in Canada – 1974-75; 1980; 1981-82; 1990-92
Adjustments to Constant Moving and Changing Circumstances
Losing a Spouse and Finding Another
Family Joys and Concerns
Changing Religious Perspectives

How do your book’s key themes directly relate to your target audience?

All of these themes would be of interest to most people, but especially to those who have encountered vast changes in their life circumstances or who are attempting to understand and accept those who have lived through those changes and adjustments.

What are the key learning outcomes you would like readers to take away from your book?

** Empathy for immigrants and the challenges they face in adjusting to life in a new country and culture.
** Understanding and acceptance of the Scottish people.
** Support for those who volunteer their time and talents in musical or literary pursuits.
** Advantages of using humour in facing adversities in life.
** Inspiration from a “senior” who remains romantic and open in later life.

What are the book’s main objectives?

In Ian’s own words when first deciding to write his memoirs: “I’ve encountered so many Scottish descendants who knew little or nothing of their ancestors and thus determined to write my life story for my descendants and others who were curious about the Scotland their ancestors left as well as the immigrant experience. Then, there are the ‘Scottish-wanna-be’ folk who have a fascination with anything Scottish. As well, most people like to read of other peoples’ misfortunes and first-hand adventures.”
From Gayle’s perspective, bringing this memoir to fruition when Ian was too ill to do so (and following his death in February 2019) became a way to grieve his loss, celebrate his life and keep him close to her. She looks upon sharing his story as an “act of love.”

Why should readers buy this book?

It’s a good read – educational, eye-opening and entertaining to boot!

What makes the authors credible sources to have written this book?

Ian Moore-Morrans enjoyed writing during most of his life but never had time to pursue it in earnest until, at age 63 and approaching retirement as a machinist, he decided “it’s now or never,” learned to type and began writing stories. To date this is his fifth published book. Ian’s musical training began at age 13 with the Salvation Army in Campbeltown, Scotland, UK. He excelled as a Scottish entertainer for most of his life, playing in bands or singing for well over 50 years in the UK, Egypt, Canada and Mexico. Ian left formal schooling in Campbeltown at age 14, had career training in the British Royal Air Force and earned his General Educational Development (G.E.D.) Certificate (Grade 12 equivalence) in Canada at age 44.

Gayle Moore-Morrans, Ian’s editor and co-author, has also been writing throughout life, both in her work capacity (as a Lutheran parish worker, a secretary, a social services director at a seniors’ centre and finally as a program director and magazine editor of a national church women’s organization) and in documenting personal and family happenings. Best of all, though, she likes to edit and enhance the writings of others. Living with Ian has given her a first-hand perspective as to his honesty, personality and talents. As his primary care-giver during his later years, she took on the task of finishing this memoir, not only editing it but also adding many sections to it as Ian’s health, memory and writing ability failed, drawing on her memories of 15 plus years living with Ian and also constantly checking with Ian as he was able to examine added portions of the manuscript. In addition, she researched facts and interviewed family members in Canada and the UK, as well as located and edited all images used in the book. Gayle’s elementary and high school education took place in New Rockford, North Dakota, USA. She has a Bachelor of Arts Degree (Magna Cum Laude), in Psychology, Religion and Philosophy, from Concordia College, Moorhead, Minnesota, USA (1963). She also understands the “immigrant” situation, having lived most of her adult life in Germany (18 years) and, since 1984, in Canada (including part of that time for two years in Mexico

What needs do this book satisfy in the market?

** Human interest story, especially from an immigrant’s perspective.
** Family heritage story from Scottish cultural and Canadian perspectives.
** Romantic story from a senior’s perspective. It’s never too late for love!
** Entertainment – sometimes providing a well-needed laugh, even in the face of adversity!

Have the authors won any writing awards?

Ian was named one of “50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading” by THE AUTHORS SHOW in 2014 and his essay “Why I Write” was a chapter in the ensuing book: 50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading, 2013-2014 Edition. Gayle (as Gayle Johannesson, Editor of Esprit magazine) received an Award of Merit Honourable Mention for “General Excellence (magazines – specialized) from The Canadian Church Press in 1999.

Have the authors published other books?

** Metal Machining Made Easy, 2002, updated 2018. A “how-to” manual.
** Beyond the Phantom Battle: Mystery at Loch Ashie, 2010. A novel of adventure and time travel.
** From Poverty to Poverty: A Scotsman Encounters Canada, 2012. A memoir.
** Jake, Little Jimmy & Big Louie, 2014. A chapter book.

Where can readers buy a copy of Came To Canada, Eh?

If you are lucky enough to live in Winnipeg, signed copies of the book at a special price are available from Gayle. Just email her to make arrangements to pick up the book (gayleian@gmail.com). Anyone else can order the book at local bookstores worldwide, distributed to the trade by The Ingram Book Company. They are also offered online through distributors such as Amazon or Barnes and Noble. Just search for the author (Ian Moore-Morrans) or the book title (Came To Canada, Eh? Adventures of a Scottish Nomad).
ISBN
978-1-5255-7591-4 (Hardcover)
978-1-5255-7592-1 (Paperback)
978-1-5255-7593-8 (eBook)
Biography & Autobiography, Personal Memoirs

***NOW AVAILABLE*** Enjoy the Teaser Trailer Video for Our New Book – Came To Canada, Eh? Adventures of a Scottish Nomad

Came To Canada, Eh? Adventures of a Scottish Nomad is now available for order (as of September 16, 2020) at the FriesenPress Bookstore. Here is the direct link: https://books.friesenpress.com/store/title/119734000144906234

As well as being available on the FriesenPress Bookstore, the book is now officially available for purchase through Ingram’s global network of over 50,000 booksellers. Over the next 1 to 5 weeks, additional retailers like Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and ebook retail channels will begin to populate their own listings for the book.

Gayle will be driving down from Winnipeg to Friesen Corporation in Altona, Manitoba within the next couple of weeks to pick up a bulk order of copies, after which she plans a socially-distanced book launch to be held at her place of residence, Fred Douglas Place, in downtown Winnipeg for residents only; however, the book launch will be videoed and made available on You-Tube, Facebook and other sites as soon as possible.

Winnipeg residents wishing to order an autographed copy of the book through Gayle should contact her by email at gayleian@gmail.com to make arrangements for pick up/delivery and payment. Soft cover copies will be available while they last at CDN $20.00 each.